Shrinking attention spans still advertised to

Associated Press just came out with an article about how :15 TV broadcast spots have taken over the typical :30 spot in commercial segments, which took over the 1 minute spot decades ago. The :15 spots are, in fact, cheaper, but now we’re being told they’re more effective than their longer counterparts. Interesting.

This kinda changes the game in terms of content. That means that messages have to be even more edited and direct that ever. No schmoozing, no background, just clear, concise messages about the product. Also, with cheaper :15 spots, advertisers can spend more on the frequency in the media buy to hit the consumer with repetition of their message.

Personally, I see the appeal. I’m more likely to read a tweet with 70 characters rather than the whole 140. I’m more likely to open an email with a strong short subject line. But TV and radio spots have been typically delivered with more content and imagery to develop the tone of the ad. Maybe it’s not necessary anymore.

I also can’t help but wondering if this trend will continue. Will our attention spans get even shorter? In 5 years, will the :8 spot be most popular among consumers? At what point does the commercial become too short where the message is not conveyed at all? One could argue that with the rise of DVR and TiVo recording systems, television broadcast ads will be obsolete in a few years anyway, right? So are we just condensing TV ads down to nonexistence?

What do you think? Do you shorter ad messages work better on you? Or are you craving more content?

Image Source: care2.com

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2 Comments on “Shrinking attention spans still advertised to”

  1. alainarkraus Says:

    I don’t mind the shorter commercials, but it would be nice if that equated to shorter commercial breaks (which I know isn’t likely to happen anytime soon with advertising revenue).


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