Posted tagged ‘professional’

Crowdsourcing has my mark

June 29, 2010

Image Source: Tangentism

Very recently, the project of developing a 12-page brochure for work was ever-so-lightly placed on my workload dinner plate. Working at an agency, I managed hundreds of design projects, however, it’s a teeny bit different at a small tech company – your million dollar budget and design team is missing. Not only did I have to produce 12 pages worth of content, but also create 6 professionally-designed spreads on a one-time graphic design pre-req class education on a limited budget? One might think impossible.

What’s is this? Crowdsourcing, you say? Sure, I’ll try it.

Basically, I typed up a detailed PDG (ad speak for project brief) and posted it to 99designs, including my $600 “prize” of how much I wanted to spend. The whole process took me about 20 minutes.

Time well spent…

I was blown away by the amount of talent I had access to. I received about 10 submissions from 10 different designers. I was able to cut designs right away that had completely missed the mark, or offer suggestions to the designs that were oh so close to what I had envisioned.

The final design that “won” exceeded my expectations on all accounts. Not only was his work phenomenal, he was very understanding with my multiple rounds of changes and nit-picking of his work. And (maybe the best part) he was Australian, which made him that much more fun to communicate with. It’s hard to get angry at messages in your inbox as you’re walking out the door when the subject line is “Good Morning, Love!”

I absolutely still see the need for design agencies and will continue to use them for large projects, however, this brochure would have easily cost me upwards of $2,000 and a month’s time if I would have gone down that road, and I wouldn’t have been able to have such a wide range of options.

I’ve also heard that Elance and Crowdspring are other good resources to use.

I absolutely recommend trying out crowdsourcing for your design projects.

What do you think? Have you used crowdsourcing before?

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Top 5 Ways to get more connections on LinkedIn (for beginners)

April 23, 2009

You’ve accept the invitation, you’ve created a profile and you have 1 connection. Now what? First of all, let me congradulate you for getting this far and actually taking the first step into social media by signing up, but the whole point of social media is actually being social. Here’s how you can get more connections and continue to build your network:

1. Search out past and present coworkers– LinkedIn is a professional networking tool, so it makes sense to start gaining connections by adding your professional relationships. Make a list of 10-20 coworkers that you’ve had acquaintance-level or above-average connections with and search for them. If they have a common name, use the advanced search tool at the side to refine the location. Don’t be afraid to add bosses, managers, secretaries, clients, entry-levels and interns- you can benefit from connecting with all types of people in all types of positions.

2. Search out friends and family– Same deal as point #1. Cousin, uncles, grandmas (way to go grandma!), moms, mom’s friends- all great connections that are bound to have contacts in your field. Add away! I think I still have 20+ outstanding sent invitations.

3. Moniter connection update statuses– Your homepage basically gives you a status report of your connections everytime you log in of who your existing connections have recently connected with. More than likely, you will know some of these people. Log in every once in awhile to see if you can make any new connections.

4. Invite non-LinkedIn members to connect– Have a coworker that is a social butterfly? Send them an invitation to connect! If they know a lot of people, they can benefit from joining an online network and can, in result, benefit you.

5. Make sure you are available to connect with– Review your privacy settings to make sure you are easily accessible to others. Also, keep your contact information up-to-date in case any new connections would like to contact you.

Even if you aren’t currently looking for a job or new clients, continuing to build your network is a great tool to have when you are wanting to stay updated with trends in your industry and stay connected with the people of both your professional and personal life. Its not as hard as it looks- honestly, it seems like I gained 100 extended connections overnight by just connecting with my list of 20 coworkers.


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